The Baseball Exchange


Midseason Analysis of a Certain Baseball Team from the Good City of New York, Specifically in the Bronx by 27yankees
July 7, 2008, 8:45 pm
Filed under: MiLB, MLB, New York Yankees | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Well, we are now a little over halfway through the statistical season, and what a wild one this has been. There is so much I could be talking about, everything from the spectacular (or is it?) season the Rays have been having to the interesting breakouts we have seen so far. But perhaps it would be easier to just talk a bit about the Yankees. Continue reading



Ain’t no Wil Nieves, part II by red
April 10, 2008, 9:22 pm
Filed under: MLB, New York Yankees | Tags: ,

You may (or may not) recall that last year we pointed out the surprising amount of hitting goodness Jose Molina had produced. Well, with Jorgie out for the time being, Molina has stepped up like last year:

Jose Molina in 2008, as of 4/10/08, 10:20 PM EST: 7-21 (.333 AVG), 4 doubles, 857 OPS.

-Red



Notes Around the League: 4/7/08 by red

The Cubs won a wild one, to say the least: an 12-inning, 4 four and 47 minute 10-8 win. (Boxscore) The Cubs led 7-0 at one point, before a 5-run fourth inning for the Pirates, and 3 more runs to make the game tied 8-8 in the 7th. As the game went into extras (in the moral words of Michael Kay, “FREE BASEBALL!”), four runs of nothing except head banging for Cubs and Pirates fans alike. (The cubs left 34 runners on base in the game – the pirates only 17.) The Cubs finally scored twice in the 12th and held on for the win.

19 total walks were given up in the game, including 5 from Evan Meek in the 12th alone. By my calculations, 466 pitches were thrown in the game. That’s what you call a marathon.

And, after all that, my fourth favorite player in the league didn’t get a hit. (That’s Nyjer Morgan, who went 0-3.)

——

Meanwhile: The D-Backs signed Chris Young to a 6 year contract, and it’s believed that it’s close to Troy Tulowitzki’s 30-mill contract in the offseason.

Uh, what? Sure, he hit 36 homers last year, but he also had a .237 AVG, a .295 OBP, and, most telling, an 89 OPS+. Now he’s solid young talent with room to improve and has obviously very impressive power. But unless he gets his average and walks up soon, those 36 homers won’t do much, and it’ll be close to 30 million wasted for below-average production.

——

In other news: It’s about 9 PM EST, and the Yanks are winning against the DEVIL Rays in the 7th inning, 4-1. Now – brace yourselves – the Yankees may score more than 4 runs for the first time this season.

As of before tonight’s game, The Yankees are batting .146 with runners in scoring position this year, worst in the league, and are averaging 2.83 runs per game, 3rd worst in the league. Now I know it’s only six games into the season, but… still. The only thing that has saved the Yanks from a Detroit-like embarrassment of a start to the season is their pitching. Perhaps a few years ago the Yanks would be 0-6 or 1-5 if not for their pitching this year.

Oh, and the team that’s second worst in AVG w/ RISP and worst in RPG? Detroit. Only the Yanks have a team ERA of 4.17 (Bloated by that 13-4 rout vs Tampa Bay), while Detroit has a team ERA of 5.30. Thus, Detroit is 0-6.

Sorry Detroit fans, but I’ve got to say it: He, he, he.

Update, 9:20 PM EST: The Yankees have scored 5 runs! And by a 2-out hit with RISP. Rejoice in the streets!

-Red



We’re probably back by red
April 7, 2008, 6:33 pm
Filed under: Miscellany, Uncategorized

Remember us? Nobody else does either besides our fan. That’s fan, singular. Make that a casual follower.

We like to think that we weren’t bad, and we weren’t, but we just posted very inconsistently. But that’s all changed.

(A week passed since these two sentences.)

So yes, that’s changed. Some of us at least are back and we’re going to going to try to give you different perspectives of anything we feel like in the baseball world. Seriously. I’m serious. I am.

If you’re new to the site, you might want to pop in the “about” page.

-Red



Pettitte confesses: He used HGH by 27yankees
December 15, 2007, 8:07 pm
Filed under: Steroids, The Mitchell Report | Tags: , , ,

 Pettitte admits briefly using HGH during 2002

Andy Pettitte used human growth hormone to recover from an elbow injury in 2002, the New York Yankees pitcher admitted two days after he was cited in the Mitchell Report. Pettitte said he tried HGH on two occasions, stressing he did it to heal faster and not enhance his performance. He emphasized he never used steroids.

This admission might change the way the Mitchell Report is being viewed and pave the way for more players to admit that they have used steroids before. Andy Pettitte is well respected within the players community and a big name like him sticking his neck out there could be a big deal.

In addition, I think that because he came clean about this, he’ll come out looking good for having the guts to take what comes with being labeled a cheater. The fact that he came clean about it doesn’t change the fact that he did cheat, but it changes the way I view him, and I’m sure it does for a lot of people too. Unlike guys like Roger Clemens and Barry Bonds who avoid coming clean and get entrenched in people calling them cheaters, he put his neck out there and admitted it was wrong. That’s good for baseball.



Initial Thoughts on the Mitchell Report by The Fallen Phoenix
December 13, 2007, 11:59 pm
Filed under: baseball, Baseball History, Steroids, The Mitchell Report | Tags:

My God, I’m posting again! I ultimately scrapped my pythag-record study because people throughout the sabermetric community beat me to the punch (particularly pizza cutter over at mvn.com–I highly suggest checking out his sabermetric studies and posts, they’re really quite illuminating!).

As we all know, former Senator Mitchell finally released his report on the usage of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball, and I have to admit, I am very, very unimpressed. I’m going to copy and paste a post I made on a message board, since I think it sums up my initial feelings quite well, and I should have a more detailed reaction next week, after I’ve had time to read the report cover-to-cover (and I escape the shadow of my coming finals):

Personally, I think the accusations and allegations of steroid users was ultimately the weakest aspect of the report, both from an investigative standpoint and from an effectiveness standpoint. Especially since this is by no means a comprehensive list, nor is everyone named in the report given equal documentation/corroborative evidence beyond hearsay and testimonial reports. Granted, there’s only so much one can expect from a report without subpoena power, but I think that’s precisely why that should have been an under-emphasized facet of the report. Either you should go all out, or not at all–and personally, I don’t think the costs of such an investigation match the positive results they’d produce.

We can talk all day about how the sexiness of names arouses interest in the report, but a lot of that interest is completely useless if it isn’t made into a positive force: that is to say, people throughout baseball (and ultimately, in the entire sports world, since there are sports that have as bad, if not worse, PED problems than baseball), at all levels and in all capacities, should put some serious effort into changing the culture of the sport in order to prevent such a thing from happening again.

I would imagine that, itself, would be incentive enough to try cleaning up the sport, and that public interest wouldn’t act as an additional motivator. But ultimately, I don’t think public interest even works that way–and if this turns out to be the firing gun that begins another round of fighting between ownership and the union (because, let’s be honest, the union probably isn’t all-too-thrilled with the allegations/accusations the report levies at individual players), then you’ve severely handicapped your ability to strengthen baseball’s anti-PED culture/policies.

It’s pretty sad that one of the first knee-jerk reactions that have been observed, both from the media and fans, was “who was named?”, rather than focusing on the positive aspects of the report, such as the descriptive “why and how did this happen in the first place?” and the prescriptive “what should baseball do about this moving forward, to prevent it from happening again?”

In the second respect, at least, I think Mitchell makes some pretty good points. Therefore, although my first impression of the report–and I’ll admit I did more skimming than reading throughout most of it, so that impression is likely to change–is rather critical, I think the report has the potential for some good. I did more reading than skimming when it came to Mitchell’s suggestions for the future, and I liked more than less of what was there.

I do fear that this report will drive a greater wedge between the owners and the union, which I think would be devastating for baseball moving forward, especially since both sides have been able to work so much better together these last few years (relative other periods of baseball history).

~The Fallen Phoenix



What Was I Even Whining About? by 27yankees

Yesterday, I made a post about how silly some of the voters for the AL MVP award were.

Today, we learned that Jimmy Rollins won, and the complaints of yesterday quickly faded away to a new set of complaints.

For example: Jimmy Rollins? He had a great season, sure, but really. His numbers were inflated by Citizen’s Bank Park. His team just barely beat the Mets. David Wright’s play was just as deserving of an MVP award as Jimmy Rollins. You could justify it by saying that the Phillies got into the playoffs, but it’s not Wright’s fault that the Mets didn’t get into the playoffs. According to VORP, Wright was second in the NL behind Hanley Ramirez, who’s team clearly was not close to the playoffs.

Meanwhile, J-Roll was ninth in the NL in VORP. Heck, even teammate Chase Utley had a higher VORP than him.

Both J-Roll and Wright play excellent defense, though J-Roll does it at a more difficult position. However, though they had similar numbers, Wright made nearly 100 less outs in a similar number of at-bats, and his OBP was far higher than that of J-Roll.

However, this year the writers were looking for a good story. What’s surprising is that they found it in J-Roll, when there was such an obvious feel-good story in Matt Holliday. He was fourth in the NL in VORP. His numbers may have been inflated by the Coors effect, but he was clutch and was a key to the Rockies getting to the playoffs. I fully expected him to get all the votes; he was far more deserving than J-Roll.

Thankfully, Holliday got second place by a very close margin, so most of the writers agreed with me, but it’s still disappointing to see him fall second. He may never have another season like this again.


In other news, the Brewers traded Johnny Estrada to the Mets for Guillermo Mota. And boy, did Omar Minaya screw the Brewers over and get exactly what he wanted. Find a catcher? Check. Make sure it’s a short commitment? Check (Estrada is under contract for one season). Lose Guillermo Mota? Check.Omar Minaya, for any faults he might have when it comes to getting prospects into his system, is a shrewd GM. He made a great move here.




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