The Baseball Exchange


Midseason Analysis of a Certain Baseball Team from the Good City of New York, Specifically in the Bronx by 27yankees
July 7, 2008, 8:45 pm
Filed under: MiLB, MLB, New York Yankees | Tags: , , , , , , ,

Well, we are now a little over halfway through the statistical season, and what a wild one this has been. There is so much I could be talking about, everything from the spectacular (or is it?) season the Rays have been having to the interesting breakouts we have seen so far. But perhaps it would be easier to just talk a bit about the Yankees. Continue reading

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Ain’t no Wil Nieves, part II by red
April 10, 2008, 9:22 pm
Filed under: MLB, New York Yankees | Tags: ,

You may (or may not) recall that last year we pointed out the surprising amount of hitting goodness Jose Molina had produced. Well, with Jorgie out for the time being, Molina has stepped up like last year:

Jose Molina in 2008, as of 4/10/08, 10:20 PM EST: 7-21 (.333 AVG), 4 doubles, 857 OPS.

-Red



Notes Around the League: 4/7/08 by red

The Cubs won a wild one, to say the least: an 12-inning, 4 four and 47 minute 10-8 win. (Boxscore) The Cubs led 7-0 at one point, before a 5-run fourth inning for the Pirates, and 3 more runs to make the game tied 8-8 in the 7th. As the game went into extras (in the moral words of Michael Kay, “FREE BASEBALL!”), four runs of nothing except head banging for Cubs and Pirates fans alike. (The cubs left 34 runners on base in the game – the pirates only 17.) The Cubs finally scored twice in the 12th and held on for the win.

19 total walks were given up in the game, including 5 from Evan Meek in the 12th alone. By my calculations, 466 pitches were thrown in the game. That’s what you call a marathon.

And, after all that, my fourth favorite player in the league didn’t get a hit. (That’s Nyjer Morgan, who went 0-3.)

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Meanwhile: The D-Backs signed Chris Young to a 6 year contract, and it’s believed that it’s close to Troy Tulowitzki’s 30-mill contract in the offseason.

Uh, what? Sure, he hit 36 homers last year, but he also had a .237 AVG, a .295 OBP, and, most telling, an 89 OPS+. Now he’s solid young talent with room to improve and has obviously very impressive power. But unless he gets his average and walks up soon, those 36 homers won’t do much, and it’ll be close to 30 million wasted for below-average production.

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In other news: It’s about 9 PM EST, and the Yanks are winning against the DEVIL Rays in the 7th inning, 4-1. Now – brace yourselves – the Yankees may score more than 4 runs for the first time this season.

As of before tonight’s game, The Yankees are batting .146 with runners in scoring position this year, worst in the league, and are averaging 2.83 runs per game, 3rd worst in the league. Now I know it’s only six games into the season, but… still. The only thing that has saved the Yanks from a Detroit-like embarrassment of a start to the season is their pitching. Perhaps a few years ago the Yanks would be 0-6 or 1-5 if not for their pitching this year.

Oh, and the team that’s second worst in AVG w/ RISP and worst in RPG? Detroit. Only the Yanks have a team ERA of 4.17 (Bloated by that 13-4 rout vs Tampa Bay), while Detroit has a team ERA of 5.30. Thus, Detroit is 0-6.

Sorry Detroit fans, but I’ve got to say it: He, he, he.

Update, 9:20 PM EST: The Yankees have scored 5 runs! And by a 2-out hit with RISP. Rejoice in the streets!

-Red



The Writers Screwed Up by 27yankees

The punchline here is that they didn’t screw up. The AL MVP was Alex Rodriguez, and he more than deserve it. In fact, he deserved to win unanimously. Did he? No. Why? Because the sportswriters out of Detroit are major homers.

The Detroit Tigers were several games out of a playoff spot. The Yankees barely scraped a playoff spot. In fact, considering how much A-Rod contributed, had he not been on the Yankees in 2007, replaced by an average third baseman, the Yankees would not have made the playoffs. That’s a lot of value that he provides.

There is no excuse for not voting for A-Rod. He did it all – excellent defense; consistent performance; excellent hitting out of an important defensive position, hitting in the clutch. Magglio had a great year; in a typical year he should have won. But A-Rod did not have a typical year; in fact, A-Rod had a historical year. There is a very legitimate argument that A-Rod had won of the ten greatest seasons of all time in 2007, and even an argument that, after Barry Bonds’ 2001 season, it is the second most valuable season by a hitter of all time. A year as historically amazing as A-Rod’s is just a class above Magglio’s year.

There were some other interesting things to note about MVP voting.  Mike Lowell… fifth? I’m sorry, but that’s just silly. According to VORP, there were fifteen more valuable hitters in the AL than Lowell. That’s a lot of people.

Jorge Posada ended up sixth behind Lowell. Despite the fact that Posada had the fourth highest VORP in the AL. I mean, catchers who can post and OPS+ of 154 with average defense just grow on trees, right?

In addition, Carlos Pena’s voting sadly disappointed me.  The fifth most valuable VORP-adjusted hitter in the AL got ninth place in voting.

Also surprising was Bobby Abreu receiving a seventh place vote. In perhaps his worst season ever, where he barely scrape a 114 OPS+.

Hopefully, the writers will learn. But until then, they make good blog fodder.

TwentySeven



They got ONE award right… by red

Let’s just say there’s been worse years for the MLB awards. Granted, they got approximately… one or zero of the gold glove awards right, but then they never get those right, and this season has been helped by some clear frontrunners in the races. A-Rod was flat-out historically amazing – I would be surprised if he didn’t get a unanimous MVP – and Holliday was probably the thin front runner, as he deserved to be, and that one game playoff probably sealed it up for him. They’ll probably get the Cy Youngs wrong, or at least the AL, but unless there’s a clear, defenite front runner, they usually get those wrong too. But, give them credit — they were completely right on the Rookie of the Year. Continue reading



Little Piece of Brain Leaves With Sportwriter by red

Possibly one of the most idiotic articles I’ve ever seen in the New York Times, this dandy was written by William Rodhen, called “Little Piece of Yankees leaves with Legends.” You know by the title it’s going to be bad.

This is from the same man who, after pointing out that absolutely no one wants to see the legend that is Joe Torre go, that those who do are, well, idiots, and explained that the proper way to rate a manager was by the number of world series he won flat-out, he suggested the Yankee hire Dusty Basker. DUSTY BAKER. Then promptly insinuated not only that all loyal Yankee fans are white, but insulted everyone who isn’t African-American and a Yankee fan by saying this:

Would loyal Yankees fans accept a manager of color? Loyal Yankees fans want to get back to the World Series, and that is not going to happen with the team as it is currently configured.

Thankfully, he said that they would accept “a manager of color,” but only because there is no other option with the team “as it is configured.” Seriously, why the hell did he even bring this up?

Now, he’s written this unappetizing column all about that “Little Piece” of the entire Yankee soul that has left, leaving the Yankees a disgusting, disrespectful, classless, ugly, godless organization. Yeah, that’s it. Now let’s break it down:

LITTLE FALLS, N.J. – A line began forming outside the Yogi Berra Museum at 11:30 yesterday morning. By noon, despite the rain and chill, the line had expanded to more than 100. By 2:30, nearly 1,000 fans had lined up and passed through the museum to have Don Mattingly sign copies of his new book, “Hitting Is Simple.” There were toddlers in strollers, teenagers, young adults, and men and women who had been Yankee fans for decades. They wanted to say hello and goodbye to a favorite son, the beloved Donnie Baseball.

OK, I can see that. Like everyone else, it’s amazing to meet a legend like Mattingly, looks like he’s got a good book even if the title is an oxymoron, it all sounds like a good time.

The overcast skies and somber receiving line gave the event the feel of a wake,

Uh-oh. Continue reading



Update: Williams denies rumors by red
November 10, 2007, 11:43 am
Filed under: Joe Torre, Los Angeles Dodgers, MLB, New York Yankees

In response to my last post, Bernie William has now dismissed the idea that he would come back to play for the Dodgers:

“I’ve been listening to all the things that have been said, and all the news and everything,” Williams said. “I’ve been kind of an outsider looking into the whole situation. It’s kind of bizarre to look at it from outside. But no, I don’t think I have any plans to do anything like that at this point.”

This makes more sense. I didn’t think that Williams would want to do something like that, and now it seems it’s just Torre trying to give Bernie a little nudge and wink, trying to persuade him to join. But by the way Bernie’s talking, I don’t think he’s returning.

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In other news: According to that same article, Joe Torre is writing a memoir with Tom Verducci on his time with the Yankees.

“The book will be as honest and as forthright as Joe Torre has been throughout his career, including his time with the Yankees,” Verducci said in a statement released by the Doubleday Broadway Publishing Group. “It will provide a revealing look at the dynasty with which he will forever be associated, and will bring readers into the dugout and the clubhouse like never before.”

In other words, Torre will respectfully bash the Yankees while praising Jeter, Williams, O’Neill, and (who could forget!11!1!!) Scott Brosius. Seriously, everyone’s talking about how little respect Torre’s gotten and doesn’t realize the surprisingly little amount of respect Torre is giving the Yankees. Both sides are at fault here. Torre has been a great manager for 12 years, but like pretty much everyone over 30 in baseball nowadays, he can’t look ahead, he continues to only look back, and doesn’t realize that maybe it is time for some sort of change. It’s what any right-minded organization would do.

Oddly enough, this reminds me of a passage from the great play Inherit the Wind.

Brady: Why is it, my old friend, that you have moved so far away from me?

Drummond: All motion is relative. Perhaps it is you who have moved away – by standing still.

Red